Toxic Textuality for Tenebrose Times…

If you thought the keyly committed core componency of Covid-19 was bad, please park your peepers on the Satan Bug dot dot dot:

In its final form, the Satan Bug is an extremely refined powder. I take a salt-spoon of this powder, go outside in the grounds of Mordon and turn the salt-spoon upside down. What happens? Every person in Mordon would be dead within an hour, the whole of Wiltshire would be an open tomb by dawn. In a week, ten days, all life would have ceased to exist in Britain. I mean all life. The Plague, the Black Death – was nothing compared with this. Long before the last man died in agony ships or planes or birds or just the waters of the North Sea would have carried the Satan Bug to Europe. We can conceive of no obstacle that can stop its eventual world-wide spread… The Lapp trapping in the far north of Sweden. The Chinese peasant tilling his rice-fields in the Yangtse valley. The cattle rancher on his station in the Australian outback, the shopper in Fifth Avenue, the primitive in Tierra del Fuego. Dead. All dead. Because I turned a salt-spoon upside down. Nothing, nothing, nothing can stop the Satan Bug.


Previously pre-posted (on Papyrocentric Performativity):

God-Finger — a radical review of Alistair MacLean’s The Satan Bug (1962)…

FractAlphic Frolix

A fractal is a shape that contains smaller (and smaller) versions of itself, like this:

The hourglass fractal


Fractals also occur in nature. For example, part of a tree looks like the tree as whole. Part of a cloud or a lung looks like the cloud or lung as a whole. So trees, clouds and lungs are fractals. The letters of an alphabet don’t usually look like that, but I decided to create a fractal alphabet — or fractalphabet — that does.

The fractalphabet starts with this minimal standard Roman alphabet in upper case, where each letter is created by filling selected squares in a 3×3 grid:


The above is stage 1 of the fractalphabet, when it isn’t actually a fractal alphabet at all. But if each filled square of the letter “A”, say, is replaced by the letter itself, the “A” turns into a fractal, like this:








Fractal A (animated)


Here’s the whole alphabet being turned into fractals:

Full fractalphabet (black-and-white)


Full fractalphabet (color)


Full fractalphabet (b&w animated)


Full fractalphabet (color animated)


Now take a full word like “THE”:



You can turn each letter into a fractal using smaller copies of itself:







Fractal THE (b&w animated)


Fractal THE (color animated)


But you can also create a fractal from “THE” by compressing the “H” into the “T”, then the “E” into the “H”, like this:




Compressed THE (animated)



The compressed “THE” has a unique appearance and is both a letter and a word. Now try a complete sentence, “THE CAT BIT THE RAT”. This is the sentence in stage 1 of the fractalphabet:



And stage 2:



And further stages:





Fractal CAT (b&w animated)


Fractal CAT (color animated)


But, as we saw with “THE” above, that’s not the only fractal you can create from “THE CAT BIT THE RAT”. Here’s what I call a 2-compression of the sentence, where every second letter has been compressed into the letter that precedes it:


THE CAT BIT THE RAT (2-comp color)


THE CAT BIT THE RAT (2-comp b&w)


And here’s a 3-compression of the sentence, where every third letter has been compressed into every second letter, and every second-and-third letter has been compressed into the preceding letter:

THE CAT BIT THE RAT (3-comp color)


THE CAT BIT THE RAT (3-comp b&w)


As you can see above, each word of the original sentence is now a unique single letter of the fractalphabet. Theoretically, there’s no limit to the compression: you could fit every word of a book in the standard Roman alphabet into a single letter of the fractalphabet. Or you could fit an entire book into a single letter of the fractalphabet (with additional symbols for punctuation, which I haven’t bothered with here).

To see what the fractalphabeting of a longer text in the standard Roman alphabet might look like, take the first verse of a poem by A.E. Housman:

On Wenlock Edge the wood’s in trouble;
His forest fleece the Wrekin heaves;
The gale it plies the saplings double,
And thick on Severn snow the leaves. (“Poem XXXI of A Shropshire Lad, 1896)

The first line looks like this in stage 1 of the fractalphabet:


Here’s stage 2 of the standard fractalphabet, where each letter is divided into smaller copies of itself:


And here’s stage 3 of the standard fractalphabet:


Now examine a colour version of the first line in stage 1 of the fractalphabet:


As with “THE” above, let’s try compressing each second letter into the letter that precedes it:


And here’s a 3-comp of the first line:


Finally, here’s the full first verse of Housman’s poem in 2-comp and 3-comp forms:

On Wenlock Edge the wood’s in trouble;
His forest fleece the Wrekin heaves;
The gale it plies the saplings double,
And thick on Severn snow the leaves. (“Poem XXXI of A Shropshire Lad, 1896)

“On Wenlock Edge” (2-comp)


“On Wenlock Edge” (3-comp)


Appendix

This is a possible lower-case version of the fractalphabet:

Stare-Way to Hair, Then

Medusa (c. 1875) by Frederick Sandys


Like William Waterhouse, Frederick Sandys (1829-1904) is called a Pre-Raphaelite. Alas, in Sandys’ case it’s true: like Rossetti, he did belong to that despicable, deplorable and downright disgusting movement. But like Rossetti again, he sometimes managed to break the strict Pre-Raphaelite principles of ugliness, ill-proportion and bad colouring. Indeed, Sandys may have been the most technically skilled of the Pre-Raphaelites. The marvellous chalk-drawing above is a good piece of evidence for that.


Previously pre-posted:

’Dys MissPerdita by Frederick Sandys

He Say, He Sigh, He Sow #49

• «Планета есть колыбель разума, но нельзя вечно жить в колыбели.» — Константин Эдуардович Циолковский (1911)

• “Planet is the cradle of mind, but one cannot live in the cradle forever.” — Konstantin Tsiolkovsky

Controlled Chaos

The chaos game is a simple mathematical technique for creating fractals. Suppose a point jumps over and over again 1/2 of the distance towards a randomly chosen vertex of a triangle. This shape appears, the so-called Sierpiński triangle:

Sierpiński triangle created by the chaos game


But the jumps don’t have to be random: you can use an array to find every possible combination of jumps and so create a more even image. I call this controlled chaos. However, if you try the chaos game (controlled or otherwise) with a square, no fractal appears unless you restrict the vertex chosen in some way. For example, if the point can’t jump towards the same vertex twice or more in a row, this fractal appears:

Ban on jumping towards previously chosen vertex, i.e. v + 0


And if the point can’t jump towards the vertex one place clockwise of the previously chosen vertex, this fractal appears:

Ban on v + 1


If the point can’t jump towards the vertex two places clockwise of the previously chosen vertex, this fractal appears:

Ban on v + 2


If the point can’t jump towards the vertex three places clockwise, or one place anticlockwise, of the previously chosen vertex, this fractal appears (compare v + 1 above):

Ban on v + 3


You can also ban vertices based on how close the point is to them at any given moment. Suppose that the point can’t jump towards the nearest vertex, which means that it must choose to jump towards either the 2nd-nearest, 3rd-nearest or 4th-nearest vertex. A fractal we’ve already seen appears:

Must jump towards vertex at distance 2, 3 or 4


In effect, not jumping towards the nearest vertex means not jumping towards a vertex twice or more in a row. Another familiar fractal appears if the point can’t jump towards the most distant vertex:

d = 1,2,3


But new fractals also appear when the jumps are determined by distance:

d = 1,2,4


d = 1,3,4


And you can add more targets for the jumping point midway between the vertices of the square:

d = 1,2,8


d = 1,4,6


d = 1,6,8


d = 1,7,8


d = 2,3,6


d = 2,3,8


d = 2,4,8


d = 2,5,6


And what if you choose the next vertex by incrementing the previously chosen vertex? Suppose the initial vertex is 1 and the possible increments are 1, 2 and 2. This new fractal appears:

increment = 1,2,2 (for example, 1 + 1 = 2, 2 + 2 = 4, 4 + 2 = 6, and 6 is adjusted thus: 6 – 4 = 2)


And with this set of increments, it’s déjà vu all over again:

i = 2,2,3


And again:

i = 2,3,2


With more possible increments, familiar fractals appear in unfamiliar ways:

i = 1,3,2,3


i = 1,3,3,2


i = 1,4,3,3


i = 2,1,2,2


i = 2,1,3,4


i = 2,2,3,4


i = 3,1,1,2


Now try increments with midpoints on the sides:

v = 4 + midpoints, i = 1,2,4


As we saw above, this incremental fractal can also be created from a square with four vertices and no midpoints:

i = 1,3,3; initial vertex = 1


But the fractal changes when the initial vertex is set to 2, i.e. to one of the midpoints:

i = 1,3,3; initial vertex = 2


And here are more inc-fractals with midpoints:

i = 1,4,2 (cf. inc-fractal 1,2,4 above)


i = 1,4,8


i = 2,6,3


i = 3,2,6

<hr

i = 4,7,8


i = 1,2,3,5


i = 1,4,5,4


i = 6,2,4,1


i = 7,6,2,2


i = 7,8,2,4


i = 7,8,4,2


Kaufkopf

Hans Holbein the Younger, Bildnis eines jungen Kaufmannes (1541) / Portrait of a Young Merchant


Previously pre-posted portrait posts:

Fur King Hal — Holbein’s portrait of Henry VIII
Anne’s Hans’ — Holbein’s portrait of Anne Cresacre

Root Rite

A square contains one of the great — perhaps the greatest — intellectual rites of passage. If each side of the square is 1 unit in length, how long are its diagonals? By Pythagoras’ theorem:

a^2 + b^2 = c^2
1^2 + 1^2 = 2, so c = √2

So each diagonal is √2 units long. But what is √2? It’s a new kind of number: an irrational number. That doesn’t mean that it’s illogical or against reason, but that it isn’t exactly equal to any ratio of integers like 3/2 or 17/12. When represented as decimals, the digits of all integer ratios either end or fall, sooner or later, into an endlessly repeating pattern:

3/2 = 1.5

17/12 = 1.416,666,666,666,666…

577/408 = 1.414,2156 8627 4509 8039,2156 8627 4509 8039,2156 8627 4509 8039,2156 8627 4509 8039,2156 8627 4509 8039,…

But when √2 is represented as a decimal, its digits go on for ever without any such pattern:

√2 = 1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,462,107…

The intellectual rite of passage comes when you understand why √2 is irrational and behaves like that:

Proof of the irrationality of √2

1. Suppose that there is some ratio, a/b, such that

2. a and b have no factors in common and

3. a^2/b^2 = 2.

4. It follows that a^2 = 2b^2.

5. Therefore a is even and there is some number, c, such that 2c = a.

6. Substituting c in #4, we derive (2c)^2 = 4c^2 = 2b^2.

7. Therefore 2c^2 = b^2 and b is also even.

8. But #7 contradicts #2 and the supposition that a and b have no factors in common.

9. Therefore, by reductio ad absurdum, there is no ratio, a/b, such that a^2/b^2 = 2. Q.E.D.

Given that subtle proof, you might think the digits of an irrational number like √2 would be difficult to calculate. In fact, they’re easy. And one method is so easy that it’s often re-discovered by recreational mathematicians. Suppose that a is an estimate for √2 but it’s too high. Clearly, if 2/a = b, then b will be too low. To get a better estimate, you simply split the difference: a = (a + b) / 2. Then do it again and again:

a = (2/a + a) / 2

If you first set a = 1, the estimates improve like this:

(2/1 + 1) / 2 = 3/2
2 – (3/2)^2 = -0.25
(2/(3/2) + 3/2) / 2 = 17/12
2 – (17/12)^2 = -0.00694…
(2/(17/12) + 17/12) / 2 = 577/408
2 – (577/408)^2 = -0.000006007…
(2/(577/408) + 577/408) / 2 = 665857/470832
2 – (665857/470832)^2 = -0.00000000000451…

In fact, the estimate doubles in accuracy (or better) at each stage (the first digit to differ is underlined):

1.5… = 3/2 (matching digits = 1)
1.4… = √2

1.416… = 17/12 (m=3)
1.414… = √2

1.414,215… = 577/408 (m=6)
1.414,213… = √2

1.414,213,562,374… = 665857/470832 (m=12)
1.414,213,562,373… = √2

1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,689… = 886731088897/627013566048 (m=24)
1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688… = √2

1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,377… (m=48)
1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376… = √2

1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,6… (m=97)
1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,5… = √2

1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,572,735,013,846,230,912,297,024,924,836,055,850,737,212,644,121,497,09
9,935,831,413,222,665,927,505,592,755,799,950,501,152,782,060,8… (m=196)
1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,572,735,013,846,230,912,297,024,924,836,055,850,737,212,644,121,497,09
9,935,831,413,222,665,927,505,592,755,799,950,501,152,782,060,5… = √2

1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,572,735,013,846,230,912,297,024,924,836,055,850,737,212,644,121,497,09
9,935,831,413,222,665,927,505,592,755,799,950,501,152,782,060,571,470,109,559,971,605,970,274,534,59
6,862,014,728,517,418,640,889,198,609,552,329,230,484,308,714,321,450,839,762,603,627,995,251,407,98
9,687,253,396,546,331,808,829,640,620,615,258,352,395,054,745,750,287,759,961,729,835,575,220,337,53
1,857,011,354,374,603,43… (m=392)
1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,572,735,013,846,230,912,297,024,924,836,055,850,737,212,644,121,497,09
9,935,831,413,222,665,927,505,592,755,799,950,501,152,782,060,571,470,109,559,971,605,970,274,534,59
6,862,014,728,517,418,640,889,198,609,552,329,230,484,308,714,321,450,839,762,603,627,995,251,407,98
9,687,253,396,546,331,808,829,640,620,615,258,352,395,054,745,750,287,759,961,729,835,575,220,337,53
1,857,011,354,374,603,40… = √2

1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,572,735,013,846,230,912,297,024,924,836,055,850,737,212,644,121,497,09
9,935,831,413,222,665,927,505,592,755,799,950,501,152,782,060,571,470,109,559,971,605,970,274,534,59
6,862,014,728,517,418,640,889,198,609,552,329,230,484,308,714,321,450,839,762,603,627,995,251,407,98
9,687,253,396,546,331,808,829,640,620,615,258,352,395,054,745,750,287,759,961,729,835,575,220,337,53
1,857,011,354,374,603,408,498,847,160,386,899,970,699,004,815,030,544,027,790,316,454,247,823,068,49
2,936,918,621,580,578,463,111,596,668,713,013,015,618,568,987,237,235,288,509,264,861,249,497,715,42
1,833,420,428,568,606,014,682,472,077,143,585,487,415,565,706,967,765,372,022,648,544,701,585,880,16
2,075,847,492,265,722,600,208,558,446,652,145,839,889,394,437,092,659,180,031,138,824,646,815,708,26
3,010,059,485,870,400,318,648,034,219,489,727,829,064,104,507,263,688,131,373,985,525,611,732,204,02
4,509,122,770,022,694,112,757,362,728,049,574… (m=783)
1.414,213,562,373,095,048,801,688,724,209,698,078,569,671,875,376,948,073,176,679,737,990,732,478,46
2,107,038,850,387,534,327,641,572,735,013,846,230,912,297,024,924,836,055,850,737,212,644,121,497,09
9,935,831,413,222,665,927,505,592,755,799,950,501,152,782,060,571,470,109,559,971,605,970,274,534,59
6,862,014,728,517,418,640,889,198,609,552,329,230,484,308,714,321,450,839,762,603,627,995,251,407,98
9,687,253,396,546,331,808,829,640,620,615,258,352,395,054,745,750,287,759,961,729,835,575,220,337,53
1,857,011,354,374,603,408,498,847,160,386,899,970,699,004,815,030,544,027,790,316,454,247,823,068,49
2,936,918,621,580,578,463,111,596,668,713,013,015,618,568,987,237,235,288,509,264,861,249,497,715,42
1,833,420,428,568,606,014,682,472,077,143,585,487,415,565,706,967,765,372,022,648,544,701,585,880,16
2,075,847,492,265,722,600,208,558,446,652,145,839,889,394,437,092,659,180,031,138,824,646,815,708,26
3,010,059,485,870,400,318,648,034,219,489,727,829,064,104,507,263,688,131,373,985,525,611,732,204,02
4,509,122,770,022,694,112,757,362,728,049,573… = √2

Crowley on Crystals

The first thing to meet our eyes [on a Himalayan expedition in 1902] was what, suppose we had landed in the country of Brobdignag, only more, so, might have been the lace handkerchief of a Super-Glumdalclitch left out to dry. It was a glittering veil of brilliance of the hillside; but closer inspection, instead of destroying the illusion, made one exclaim with increased enthusiasm.

The curtain had been formed by crystalline deposits from a hot spring (38.3° centigrade). The incrustation is exquisitely white and exquisitely geometrical in every detail. The burden of the cynicism of my six and twenty years fell from me like a dream. I trod the shining slopes; they rustled under my feet rather as snow does in certain conditions. (The sound is strangely exhilarating.) It is a voluptuous flattery like the murmurous applause of a refined multitude, with the instinctive ecstatic reverence of a man conscious of his unworthiness entering paradise. At the top of the curtain is the basin from which it proceeds, the largest of several similar formations. It is some thirty-one feet in diameter, an almost perfect circle. The depth in the middle is little over two feet. It is a bath for Venus herself.

I had to summon my consciousness of godhead before venturing to invade it. The water steams delicately with sulphurous emanations, yet the odour is subtly delicious. Knowles, the doctor and I spent more than an hour and a half reposing in its velvet warmth, in the intoxicating dry mountain air, caressed by the splendour of the sun. I experienced all the ecstasy of the pilgrim who has come to the end of his hardships. I felt as if I had been washed clean of all the fatigues of the journey. In point of fact, I had arrived, despite myself, at perfect physical condition. I had realized from the first that the proper preparation for a journey of this sort is to get as fat as possible before starting, and stay as fat as possible as long as possible. I was now in the condition in which Pfannl had been at Srinagar. I could have gone forty-eight hours without turning a hair. — The Confessions of Aleister Crowley: An Autohagiography (1929)