This Means RaWaR

The Overlord of the Über-Feral says: Welcome to my bijou bloguette. You can scroll down to sample more or simply:

• Read a Writerization at Random: RaWaR


• O.o.t.Ü.-F.: More Maverick than a Monkey-Munching Mingrelian Myrmecologist Marinated in Mescaline…

• ¿And What Doth It Mean To Be Flesh?

მათემატიკა მსოფლიოს მეფე


*Der Muntsch ist Etwas, das überwunden werden soll.

Cornuscopia

Cornelis de Heem, Stilleven met fruitmand / Still Life with Basket of Fruit (c. 1654)
(click for larger)


Note: The title of this incendiary intervention is a blend (or mash-up, as the non-conformist maverick community might say) of Latin cornucopia, “horn of plenty”, and Greek scopos, σκόπος, “seeing”.

Performativizing the Polygonic #3

Pre-previously in my passionate portrayal of polygonic performativity, I showed how a single point jumping randomly (or quasi-randomly) towards the vertices of a polygon can create elaborate fractals. For example, if the point jumps 1/φth (= 0.6180339887…) of the way towards the vertices of a pentagon, it creates this fractal:

Point jumping 1/φth of the way to a randomly (or quasi-randomly) chosen vertex of a pentagon


But as you might expect, there are different routes to the same fractal. Suppose you take a fractal and select a single vertex. Now, measure the distance to each vertex, v(1,i=1..5), of the original pentagon (including the selected vertex) and reduce it by 1/φ to find the position of a new vertex, v(2,i=1..5). If you do this for each vertex of the original pentagon, then to each vertex of the new pentagons, and so on, in the end you create the same fractal as the jumping point does:

Shrink pentagons by 1/φ, stage #1


Stage #2


Stage #3


Stage #4


Stage #5


Stage #6


Shrink by 1/φ (animated) (click for larger if blurred)


And here is the route to a centre-filled variant of the fractal:

Central pentagon, stage #1


Stage #2


Stage #3


Stage #4


Stage #5


Stage #6


Central pentagon (animated) (click for larger if blurred)


Using this shrink-the-polygon method, you can reach the same fractals by a third route. This time, use vertex v(1,i) of the original polygon as the centre of the new polygon with its vertices v(2,i=1..5). Creation of the fractal looks like this:

Pentagons over vertices, shrink by 1/φ, stage #1 (no pentagons over vertices)


Stage #2


Stage #3


Stage #4


Stage #4


Stage #5


Stage #7


Pentagons over vertices (animated) (click for larger if blurred)


And here is a third way of creating the centre-filled pentagonal fractal:

Pentagons over vertices and central pentagon, stage #1


Stage #2


Stage #3


Stage #4


Stage #5


Stage #6


Stage #7


Pentagons over vertices with central pentagon (animated) (click for larger if blurred)


And here is a fractal created when there are three pentagons to a side and the pentagons are shrunk by 1/φ^2 = 0.3819660112…:

Pentagon at vertex + pentagon at mid-point of side, shrink by 1/φ^2


Final stage


Pentagon at vertex + pentagon at mid-point of side (animated) (click for larger if blurred)


Pentagon at vertex + pentagon at mid-point of side + central pentagon, shrink by 1/φ^2 and c. 0.5, stage #1


Stage #2


Stage #3


Stage #4


Stage #5


Pentagon at vertex + mid-point + center (animated) (click for larger if blurred)


Previously pre-posted:

Performativizing the Polygonic #2
Performativizing the Polygonic #1

Locke’s LOX

“He that will not set himself proudly at the top of all things; but will consider the Immensity of this Fabrick, and the great variety, that is to be found in this little and inconsiderable part of it, which he has to do with, may be apt to think, that in other Mansions of it, there may be other, and different intelligent Beings, of whose Faculties, he has as little Knowledge or Apprehension, as a worm shut up in one drawer of a Cabinet, hath of the Senses or Understanding of a Man.” — John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689), viâ David Wootton’s The Invention of Science (2015)


Performative Post-Scriptum

The title of this incendiary intervention is intended to suggest the idea of Locke’s ideas acting as a rocket-fuel for the imagination like LOX or lox, meaning “liquid oxygen explosive; later interpreted as representing liquid oxygen” (OED).

Performativizing the Polygonic #2

Suppose a café offers you free drinks for three days. You can have tea or coffee in any order and any number of times. If you want tea every day of the three, you can have it. So here’s a question: how many ways can you choose from two kinds of drink in three days? One simple way is to number each drink, tea = 1, coffee = 2, then count off the choices like this:


1: 111
2: 112
3: 121
4: 122
5: 211
6: 212
7: 221
8: 222

Choice #1 is 111, which means tea every day. Choice #6 is 212, which means coffee on day 1, tea on day 2 and coffee on day 3. Now look at the counting again and the way the numbers change: 111, 112, 121, 122, 211… It’s really base 2 using 1 and 2 rather than 0 and 1. That’s why there are 8 ways to choose two drinks over three days: 8 = 2^3. Next, note that you use the same number of 1s to count the choices as the number of 2s. There are twelve 1s and twelve 2s, because each number has a mirror: 111 has 222, 112 has 221, 121 has 212, and so on.

Now try the number of ways to choose from three kinds of drink (tea, coffee, orange juice) over two days:


11, 12, 13, 21, 22, 23, 31, 32, 33 (c=9)

There are 9 ways to choose, because 9 = 3^2. And each digit, 1, 2, 3, is used exactly six times when you write the choices. Now try the number of ways to choose from three kinds of drink over three days:


111, 112, 113, 121, 122, 123, 131, 132, 133, 211, 212, 213, 221, 222, 223, 231, 232, 233, 311, 312, 313, 321, 322, 323, 331, 332, 333 (c=27)

There are 27 ways and (by coincidence) each digit is used 27 times to write the choices. Now try three drinks over four days:


1111, 1112, 1113, 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1211, 1212, 1213, 1221, 1222, 1223, 1231, 1232, 1233, 1311, 1312, 1313, 1321, 1322, 1323, 1331, 1332, 1333, 2111, 2112, 2113, 2121, 2122, 2123, 2131, 2132, 2133, 2211, 2212, 2213, 2221, 2222, 2223, 2231, 2232, 2233, 2311, 2312, 2313, 2321, 2322, 2323, 2331, 2332, 2333, 3111, 3112, 3113, 3121, 3122, 3123, 3131, 3132, 3133, 3211, 3212, 3213, 3221, 3222, 3223, 3231, 3232, 3233, 3311, 3312, 3313, 3321, 3322, 3323, 3331, 3332, 3333 (c=81)

There are 81 ways to choose and each digit is used 108 times. But the numbers don’t have represent choices of drink in a café. How many ways can a point inside an equilateral triangle jump four times half-way towards the vertices of the triangle? It’s the same as the way to choose from three drinks over four days. And because the point jumps toward each vertex in a symmetrical way the same number of times, you get a nice even pattern, like this:

vertices = 3, jump = 1/2


Every time the point jumps half-way towards a particular vertex, its position is marked in a unique colour. The fractal, also known as a Sierpiński triangle, actually represents all possible choices for an indefinite number of jumps. Here’s the same rule applied to a square. There are four vertices, so the point is tracing all possible ways to choose four vertices for an indefinite number of jumps:

v = 4, jump = 1/2


As you can see, it’s not an obvious fractal. But what if the point jumps two-thirds of the way to its target vertex and an extra target is added at the centre of the square? This attractive fractal appears:

v = 4 + central target, jump = 2/3


If the central target is removed and an extra target is added on each side, this fractal appears:

v = 4 + 4 midpoints, jump = 2/3


That fractal is known as a Sierpiński carpet. Now up to the pentagon. This fractal of endlessly nested contingent pentagons is created by a point jumping 1/φ = 0·6180339887… of the distance towards the five vertices:

v = 5, jump = 1/φ


With a central target in the pentagon, this fractal appears:

v = 5 + central, jump = 1/φ


The central red pattern fits exactly inside the five that surround it:

v = 5 + central, jump = 1/φ (closeup)


v = 5 + c, jump = 1/φ (animated)


For a fractal of endlessly nested contingent hexagons, the jump is 2/3:

v = 6, jump = 2/3


With a central target, you get a filled variation of the hexagonal fractal:

v = 6 + c, jump = 2/3


And for a fractal of endlessly nested contingent octagons, the jump is 1/√2 = 0·7071067811… = √½:

v = 8, jump = 1/√2


Previously pre-posted:

Performativizing the Polygonic

Mullennial Mysterium

Mull (island) Arg. Malaios c. 150. Pre-Celtic island name. (The Oxford Dictionary of British Place Names)


Elsewhere other-engageable:

Place of Glades — a review of The Oxford Dictionary of British Place Names, A.D. Mills (1991)

Binary Babushkas

What’s the connection between grandmothers and this set of numbers?


1, 2, 6, 12, 44, 92, 184, 1208, 1256, 4792, 9912, 19832, 39664, 563952, 576464, 4496112, 4499184, 17996528, 17997488, 143972080, 145057520, 145070832, 294967024, 589944560...

To take the first step towards the answer, you need to put the numbers into binary:


1, 10, 110, 1100, 101100, 1011100, 10111000, 10010111000, 10011101000, 1001010111000, 10011010111000, 100110101111000, 1001101011110000, 10001001101011110000, 10001100101111010000, 10001001001101011110000, 10001001010011011110000, 1000100101001101011110000, 1000100101001111010110000, 1000100101001101011011110000, 1000101001010110011011110000, 1000101001011001101011110000, 10001100101001101011011110000, 100011001010011101011011110000...

The second step is compare those binary numbers with these binary numbers, which represent 1 to 30:


1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010, 1011, 1100, 1101, 1110, 1111, 10000, 10001, 10010, 10011, 10100, 10101, 10110, 10111, 11000, 11001, 11010, 11011, 11100, 11101, 11110...

To see what’s going on, take the first five numbers from each set:


• 1, 10, 110, 1100, 101100...
• 1, 10, 11, 100, 101...

What’s going on? If you look, you can see the n-th binary number of set 1 contains the digits of all binary numbers <= n in set 2. For example, 101100 is the 5th binary number in set 1, so it contains the digits of the binary numbers 1 to 5:


101100 ← 1
101100 ← 10
101100 ← 11
101100 ← 100
101100 ← 101

Now try 1256 = 10,011,101,000, the ninth number in set 1. It contains all the binary numbers from 1 to 1001:


10011101000 ← 1 (n=1)
10011101000 ← 10 (n=2)
10011101000 ← 11 (n=3)
10011101000 ← 100 (n=4)
10011101000 ← 101 (n=5)
10011101000 ← 110 (n=6)
10011101000 ← 111 (n=7)
10011101000 ← 1000 (n=8)
10011101000 ← 1001 (n=9)

But where do grandmothers come in? They come in via this famous toy:

Nested doll or Russian doll

It’s called a Russian doll and the way all the smaller dolls pack inside the largest doll reminds me of the way all the smaller numbers 1 to 1010 pack into 1001010111000. But in the Russian language, as you might expect, Russian dolls aren’t called Russian dolls. Instead, they’re called matryoshki (матрёшки, singular матрёшка), meaning “little matrons”. However, there’s a mistaken idea in English that in Russian they’re called babushka dolls, from Russian бабушка, babuška, meaning “grandmother”. And that’s what I thought, until I did a little research.

But the mistake is there, so I’ll call these babushka numbers or grandmother numbers:


1, 2, 6, 12, 44, 92, 184, 1208, 1256, 4792, 9912, 19832, 39664, 563952, 576464, 4496112, 4499184, 17996528, 17997488, 143972080, 145057520, 145070832, 294967024, 589944560...

They’re sequence A261467 at the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. They go on for ever, but the biggest known so far is 589,944,560 = 100,011,001,010,011,101,011,011,110,000 in binary. And here is that binary babushka with its binary babies:


100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1 (n=1)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10 (n=2)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11 (n=3)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 100 (n=4)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 101 (n=5)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 110 (n=6)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 111 (n=7)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1000 (n=8)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1001 (n=9)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1010 (n=10)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1011 (n=11)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1100 (n=12)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1101 (n=13)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1110 (n=14)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 1111 (n=15)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10000 (n=16)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10001 (n=17)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10010 (n=18)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10011 (n=19)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10100 (n=20)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10101 (n=21)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10110 (n=22)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 10111 (n=23)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11000 (n=24)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11001 (n=25)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11010 (n=26)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11011 (n=27)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11100 (n=28)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11101 (n=29)
100011001010011101011011110000 ← 11110 (n=30)

Babushka numbers exist in higher bases, of course. Here are the first thirteen in base 3 or ternary:


1 contains 1 (c=1) (n=1)
12 contains 1, 2 (c=2) (n=5)
102 contains 1, 2, 10 (c=3) (n=11)
1102 contains 1, 2, 10, 11 (c=4) (n=38)
10112 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12 (c=5) (n=95)
101120 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20 (c=6) (n=285)
1021120 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21 (c=7) (n=933)
10211220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22 (c=8) (n=2805)
100211220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100 (c=9) (n=7179)
10021011220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101 (c=10) (n=64284)
1001010211220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101, 102 (c=11) (n=553929)
1001011021220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101, 102, 110 (c=12) (n=554253)
10010111021220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101, 102, 110, 111 (c=13) (n=1663062)

Look at 1,001,010,211,220 (n=553929) and 1,001,011,021,220 (n=554253). They have the same number of digits, but the babushka 1,001,011,021,220 manages to pack in one more baby:


1001010211220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101, 102 (c=11) (n=553929)
1001011021220 contains 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101, 102, 110 (c=12) (n=554253)

That happens in binary too:


10010111000 contains 1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001 (c=9) (n=1208)
10011101000 contains 1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010 (c=10) (n=1256)

What happens in higher bases? Watch this space.

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #67

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Early RiserDecline and Fall, Evelyn Waugh (1928)

The Future is FascistFuturism, Richard Humphreys (1999 Tate Publishing)

Mystery and MeaningDictionary of Plant Names, Allen J. Coombes (1985)

Noshing on NoxiousnessNekro-Noxious: Toxic Tales of True Transgression in Miami Municipal Mortuary, Norberto Fetidescu (TransVisceral Books 2018)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

Go Too Woke on an Egg

Goop to pay out over unproven health benefits of vaginal eggs

Goop, the new age lifestyle and publishing company founded by the [actress] Gwyneth Paltrow, has agreed to pay a substantial settlement over unproven claims about the health benefits of its infamous vaginal eggs. Goop’s website still claims that inserting the eggs into the vagina helps “cultivate sexual energy, clear chi pathways in the body, intensify femininity, and invigorate our life force”.

Its $66 Jade Egg and $55 Rose Quartz egg are still offered for sale on the site, but the company has agreed to pay $145,000 to settle allegations that it previously made unscientific claims about the eggs, and a herbal essence that it had said helped tackle depression.

It also agreed to refund customers who purchased the products from January to August last year. During that period it claimed the eggs could balance hormones, regulate menstrual cycles, prevent uterine prolapse, and increase bladder control, according to officials in Santa Clara part of a group of California district attorneys who filed the lawsuit. — Goop to pay out over unproven health benefits of vaginal eggs, The Guardian, 5ix2018.


N.B. The title of this incendiary intervention is a paronomasia on the old British advertising slogan “Go to work on an egg.”

Capnic Caravan

Sleep, Dopesmoker (2012 reissue)


I’ve never been able to get into the band Sleep and, not being a keyly committed core component of the hive-mind, I’m not a fan of dopesmoking either. But this is a good cover by the artist Arik Roper, with a nice Dune-y vibe.


To engage issues around the title of this incendiary intervention, see here:

capno-, capn-, capnod- (Greek: smoke; vapor; sooty) — Wordquests