I Say, I Sigh, I Sow #14

“In a very real sense, the Holocaust, as the ultimate moral and aesthetic obscenity, was also the ultimate drum-solo.” — Simon Whitechapel, 31i18

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #71

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents…

Clive DriveUnreliable Memoirs (1980) and Always Unreliable: The Memoirs (2001), Clive James

Nou’s WhoArt Nouveau, Camilla de la Bedoyere (Flame Tree Publishing 2005)

Hit and MistletoeThrough It All I’ve Always Laughed, Count Arthur Strong (Faber & Faber 2013)

Beauties and BeastsShardik, Richard Adams (1974)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

Bee Here Now

Russian Bee Stamps 2005


British Bee Stamps 2015


Elsewhere other-accessible

Royal Mail bee stamps designed to raise awareness of species

Down in the Bassment

Cover of Damned to Earth’s self-titled debut


I like the cover and the music.


Previously Pre-Posted…

Museek — in which I don’t like the cover but do like the music
A Little Light Night Music — in which I don’t like the music but do like the cover

ConstKunst

John Constable’s Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop’s Grounds (1825, Frick Collection)


Elsewhere other-engageable…

• Discussion of Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop’s Grounds (1823) at Wikipedia

Lavoro di Leonardo?

I first came across this quote about cats in French:

« Le plus petit des félins est une œuvre d’art. »
• “The smallest of felines is a work of art.”

It’s widely attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, but I can’t find any proof that he ever said it. Here it is in a fuller Italian version:

« Anche il più piccolo dei felini, il gatto, è un capolavoro. »
• Même le plus petit des félins, le chat, est un chef-d’œuvre.
•• Even the smallest of felines, the cat, is a masterpiece.

It’s a good quote, wherever it comes from. But the attribution to Leonardo reminds of another saying in Italian: Se non è vero, è ben trovato — “If it’s not true, it’s a happy invention.”

(From Pinterest)

Bash the Trash

From George Orwell’s “As I Please” for 11th February 1944, Tribune:

THE FOLLOWING lines are quoted in Anthony Trollope’s Autobiography:

When Payne-Knight’s Taste was issued on the town
A few Greek verses in the text set down
Were torn to pieces, mangled into hash,
Hurled to the flames as execrable trash;
In short, were butchered rather than dissected
And several false quantities detected;
Till, when the smoke had risen from the cinders
It was discovered that — the lines were Pindar’s!

Trollope does not make clear who is the author of these lines, and I should be very glad if any reader could let me know. But I also quote them for their own sake — that is, for the terrible warning to literary critics that they contain — and for the sake of drawing attention to Trollope’s Autobiography, which is a most fascinating book, although or because it is largely concerned with money.


Elsewhere Other-Accessible…

Pindar (c. 518-438 BC) at Wikipedia
An Analytical Inquiry Into the Principles of Taste (1806) by Richard Payne-Knight at Archive.org
An Autobiography and Other Writings (1869) by Anthony Trollope at Gutenberg