Cornuscopia

Cornelis de Heem, Stilleven met fruitmand / Still Life with Basket of Fruit (c. 1654)
(click for larger)


Note: The title of this incendiary intervention is a blend (or mash-up, as the non-conformist maverick community might say) of Latin cornucopia, “horn of plenty”, and Greek scopos, σκόπος, “seeing”.

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #67

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Early RiserDecline and Fall, Evelyn Waugh (1928)

The Future is FascistFuturism, Richard Humphreys (1999 Tate Publishing)

Mystery and MeaningDictionary of Plant Names, Allen J. Coombes (1985)

Noshing on NoxiousnessNekro-Noxious: Toxic Tales of True Transgression in Miami Municipal Mortuary, Norberto Fetidescu (TransVisceral Books 2018)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

Eyeway to Shell


Previously pre-posted:

Eyeway to Ell — a better paronamasia than this one…

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #65

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Fratele Gets You NowhereO mie nouă sute optzeci şi patru, George Orwell, translated by Mihnea Gafiţa (Biblioteca Polirom 2002)

Whole Lotta ScottHighway to Hell: The Life and Times of AC/DC Legend Bon Scott, Clinton Walker (Pan Books 1996)

The Bella and the BoltonianA Forger’s Tale: Confessions of the Bolton Forger, Shaun Greenhalgh (Allen & Unwin 2017)

Clubbed to DeafThe Haçienda: How Not to Run a Club, Peter Hook (Simon & Schuster 2009)

Dizh Izh Vizh BizhVilest Visions: The Darkest, Despicablest, Disgustingest Decapitations vs The Nastiest, Noxiousest, Nauseatingest Necrophilia, Dr Samuel P. Salatta and Dr William K. Phipps (Visceral Visions 2018)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

Ratschläge einer Raupe

“Alice and the Caterpillar” by John Tenniel (1820-1914), from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland (1865)


Ratschläge einer Raupe is one possible German translation of “Advice from a Caterpillar”, which is the title of chapter five of Alice in Wonderland. But the drawing above doesn’t need a translation. John Tenniel and Lewis Carroll were a classic combination, like Quentin Blake and J.P. Martin or Thomas Henry and Richmal Crompton. Tenniel drew fantastic things in a matter-of-fact way, which was just right.

But that makes me wonder about Ratschläge einer Raupe. In German, Rat-schlag means “piece of advice” and Ratschläge is the plural. At first glance, the title is more fun in German: it alliterates and trips off the the tongue in a way the English doesn’t. And Schlag literally means “blow, stroke”, which captures the behaviour of the caterpillar well. Like many of the characters Alice encounters in Wonderland, he is a prickly and aggressive interlocutor. “Advice from a Caterpillar” is plain by comparison.

So perhaps that makes it better: it’s a matter-of-fact title for a surreal chapter. Tenniel’s art echoes that.

Ruff Stuff

Zelfportret (1601) by Joachim Wtewael (1566-1638) (pron. roughly OO-tuh-vaal), as seen in Phaidon’s 500 Self-Portraits


Previously pre-posted:

She-ShellPerseus Rescuing Andromeda (1611) by Wtewael

Ju Dunnit

Giuditta con la testa di Oloferne (c. 1612), Cristofano Allori (1577-1621)


Interesting facts in-terms-of-issues-around this painting, known as Judith with the Head of Holofernes in English: according to Allori’s first biographer Filippo Baldinucci, the severed head is a self-portrait of Allori, the decapitatrix is an ex-girlfriend, Maria di Giovanni Mazzafirri, and the old servant is her mother (from A Face to the World, Laura Cumming, 2009).