Count Amounts

One of my favourite integer sequences is what I call the digit-line. You create it by taking this very familiar integer sequence:

• 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20…

And turning it into this one:

• 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 1, 6, 1, 7, 1, 8, 1, 9, 2, 0… (A033307 in the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences)

You simply chop all numbers into single digits. What could be simpler? Well, creating the digit-line couldn’t be simpler, but it is in fact a very complex object. There are hidden depths in its patterns, as even a brief look will uncover. For example, you can try counting the digits as they appear one-by-one in the line and seeing whether the digit-counts compare. Do the 1s of the digit-line always outnumber the 0s, as you might expect? Yes, they do (unless you start the digit-line 0, 1, 2, 3…). But do the 2s always outnumber the 0s? No: at position 2, there’s a 2, and at position 11 there’s a 0. So that’s one 2 and one 0. Does it happen again? Yes, it happens again at the 222nd digit of the digit-line, as below:

1, 2count=1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 0count=1, 1, 1, 1, 22, 1, 3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 1, 6, 1, 7, 1, 8, 1, 9, 23, 02, 24, 1, 25, 26, 27, 3, 28, 4, 29, 5, 210, 6, 211, 7, 212, 8, 213, 9, 3, 03, 3, 1, 3, 214, 3, 3, 3, 4, 3, 5, 3, 6, 3, 7, 3, 8, 3, 9, 4, 04, 4, 1, 4, 215, 4, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 4, 6, 4, 7, 4, 8, 4, 9, 5, 05, 5, 1, 5, 216, 5, 3, 5,4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 5, 7, 5, 8, 5, 9, 6, 06, 6, 1, 6, 217, 6, 3, 6, 4, 6, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 6, 8, 6, 9, 7, 07, 7, 1, 7, 218, 7, 3, 7, 4, 7, 5, 7, 6, 7, 7, 7, 8, 7, 9, 8, 08, 8, 1, 8, 219, 8, 3, 8, 4, 8, 5, 8, 6, 8, 7, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 09, 9, 1, 9, 220, 9, 3, 9, 4, 9, 5, 9, 6, 9, 7, 9, 8, 9, 9, 1, 010, 011, 1, 012, 1, 1, 013, 221, 1, 014, 3, 1, 015, 4, 1, 016, 5, 1, 017, 6, 1, 018, 7, 1, 019, 8, 1, 020, 9, 1, 1, 021

So count(2) = count(0) = 1 at digit 11 of the digit-line in the 0 of what was originally 10. And count(2) = count(0) = 21 @ digit 222 in the 0 of what was originally 110. Is a pattern starting to emerge? Yes, it is. Here are the first few points at which the count(2) = count(0) in the digit-line of base 10:

1 @ 11 in 10
21 @ 222 in 110
321 @ 3333 in 1110
4321 @ 44444 in 11110
54321 @ 555555 in 111110
654321 @ 6666666 in 1111110
7654321 @ 77777777 in 11111110
87654321 @ 888888888 in 111111110
987654321 @ 9999999999 in 1111111110
10987654321 @ 111111111110 in 11111111110
120987654321 @ 1222222222221 in 111111111110
[...]

The count(2) = count(0) = 321 at position 3333 in the digit-line, and 4321 at position 44444, and 54321 at position 555555, and so on. I don’t understand why these patterns occur, but you can predict the count-and-position of 2s and 0s easily until position 9999999999, after which things become more complicated. Related patterns for 2 and 0 occur in all other bases except binary (which doesn’t have a 2 digit). Here’s base 6:

1 @ 11 in 10 (1 @ 7 in 6)
21 @ 222 in 110 (13 @ 86 in 42)
321 @ 3333 in 1110 (121 @ 777 in 258)
4321 @ 44444 in 11110 (985 @ 6220 in 1554)
54321 @ 555555 in 111110 (7465 @ 46655 in 9330)
1054321 @ 11111110 in 1111110 (54121 @ 335922 in 55986)
12054321 @ 122222221 in 11111110 (380713 @ 2351461 in 335922)
132054321 @ 1333333332 in 111111110 (2620201 @ 16124312 in 2015538)
1432054321 @ 14444444443 in 1111111110 (17736745 @ 108839115 in 12093234)
15432054321 @ 155555555554 in 11111111110 (118513705 @ 725594110 in 72559410)
205432054321 @ 2111111111105 in 111111111110 (783641641 @ 4788921137 in 435356466)
2205432054321 @ 22222222222220 in 1111111111110 (5137206313 @ 31345665636 in 2612138802)

And what about comparing other pairs of digits? In fact, the count of all digits except 0 matches infinitely often. To write the numbers 1..9 takes one of each digit (except 0). To write the numbers 1 to 99 takes twenty of each digit (except 0). Here’s the proof:

11, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61, 71, 81, 91, 12, 01, 13, 14, 15, 22, 16, 32, 17, 42, 18, 52, 19, 62, 110, 72, 111, 82, 112, 92, 23, 02, 24, 113, 25, 26, 27, 33, 28, 43, 29, 53, 210, 63, 211, 73, 212, 83, 213, 93, 34, 03, 35, 114, 36, 214, 37, 38, 39, 44, 310, 54, 311, 64, 312, 74, 313, 84, 314, 94, 45, 04, 46, 115, 47, 215, 48, 315, 49, 410, 411, 55, 412, 65, 413, 75, 414, 85, 415, 95, 56, 05, 57, 116, 58, 216, 59, 316, 510, 416, 511, 512, 513, 66, 514, 76, 515, 86, 516, 96, 67, 06, 68, 117, 69, 217, 610, 317, 6
11
, 417, 612, 517, 613, 614, 615, 77, 616, 87, 617, 97, 78, 07, 79, 118, 710, 218, 711, 318, 712, 418, 713, 518, 714, 618, 715, 716, 717, 88, 718, 98, 89, 08, 810, 119, 811, 219, 812, 319, 813, 419, 814, 519, 815, 619, 816, 719, 817, 818, 819, 99, 910, 09, 911, 120, 912, 220, 913, 320, 914, 420, 915, 520, 916, 620, 917, 720, 918, 820, 919, 920

And what about writing 1..999, 1..9999, and so on? If you think about it, for every pair of non-zero digits, d1 and d2, all numbers containing one digit can be matched with a number containing the other. 100 → 200, 111 → 222, 314 → 324, 561189571 → 562289572, and so on. So in counting 1..999, 1..9999, 1..99999, you use the same number of non-zero digits. And once again a pattern emerges:

count(0) = 0; count(1) = 1; count(2) = 1; count(3) = 1; count(4) = 1; count(5) = 1; count(6) = 1; count(7) = 1; count(8) = 1; count(9) = 1 (writing 1..9)
count(0) = 9; count(1) = 20; count(2) = 20; count(3) = 20; count(4) = 20; count(5) = 20; count(6) = 20; count(7) = 20; count(8) = 20; count(9) = 20 (writing 1..99)
0: 189; 1: 300; 2: 300; 3: 300; 4: 300; 5: 300; 6: 300; 7: 300; 8: 300; 9: 300 (writing 1..999)
0: 2889; 1: 4000; 2: 4000; 3: 4000; 4: 4000; 5: 4000; 6: 4000; 7: 4000; 8: 4000; 9: 4000 (writing 1..9999)
0: 38889; 1: 50000; 2: 50000; 3: 50000; 4: 50000; 5: 50000; 6: 50000; 7: 50000; 8: 50000; 9: 50000 (writing 1..99999)
0: 488889; 1: 600000; 2: 600000; 3: 600000; 4: 600000; 5: 600000; 6: 600000; 7: 600000; 8: 600000; 9: 600000 (writing 1..999999)
0: 5888889; 1: 7000000; 2: 7000000; 3: 7000000; 4: 7000000; 5: 7000000; 6: 7000000; 7: 7000000; 8: 7000000; 9: 7000000 (writing 1..9999999)
[...]

And here’s base 6 again:

0: 0; 1: 1; 2: 1; 3: 1; 4: 1; 5: 1 (writing 1..5)
0: 5; 1: 20; 2: 20; 3: 20; 4: 20; 5: 20 (writing 1..55 in base 6)
0: 145; 1: 300; 2: 300; 3: 300; 4: 300; 5: 300 (writing 1..555)
0: 2445; 1: 4000; 2: 4000; 3: 4000; 4: 4000; 5: 4000 (writing 1..5555)
0: 34445; 1: 50000; 2: 50000; 3: 50000; 4: 50000; 5: 50000 (writing 1..55555)
0: 444445; 1: 1000000; 2: 1000000; 3: 1000000; 4: 1000000; 5: 1000000 (writing 1..555555)
0: 5444445; 1: 11000000; 2: 11000000; 3: 11000000; 4: 11000000; 5: 11000000 (writing 1..5555555)
0: 104444445; 1: 120000000; 2: 120000000; 3: 120000000; 4: 120000000; 5: 120000000 (writing 1..55555555)
0: 1144444445; 1: 1300000000; 2: 1300000000; 3: 1300000000; 4: 1300000000; 5: 1300000000 (writing 1..555555555)

Can You Dij It? #2

It’s very simple, but I’m fascinated by it. I’m talking about something I call the digit-line, or the stream of digits you get when you split numbers in a particular base into individual digits. For example, here are the numbers one to ten in bases 2 and 3:

Base = 2: 1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010…
Base = 3: 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101…


If you turn them into digit-lines, they look like this:

Base = 2: 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0… (A030190 in the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences)
Base = 3: 1, 2, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1… (A003137 in the OEIS)


At the tenth digit of the two digit-lines, both digits equal zero for the first time:

Base = 2: 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0
Base = 3: 1, 2, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0


When the binary and ternary digits are represented together, the digit-lines look like this:

(1,1), (1,2), (0,1), (1,0), (1,1), (1,1), (0,1), (0,2), (1,2), (0,0)


But in base 4, the tenth digit of the digit-line is 1. So when do all the digits of the digit-line first equal zero for bases 2 to 4? Here the early integers in those bases:

Base 2: 1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111, 1000, 1001, 1010, 1011, 1100, 1101, 1110, 1111, 10000, 10001, 10010, 10011, 10100, 10101…

Base 3: 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101, 102, 110, 111, 112, 120, 121, 122, 200, 201, 202, 210, 211, 212, 220, 221, 222, 1000, 1001, 1002…

Base 4: 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12, 13, 20, 21, 22, 23, 30, 31, 32, 33, 100, 101, 102, 103, 110, 111, 112, 113, 120, 121, 122, 123, 130, 131, 132, 133, 200…


And here are the digits of the digit-line in bases 2 to 4 represented together:

(1,1,1), (1,2,2), (0,1,3), (1,0,1), (1,1,0), (1,1,1), (0,1,1), (0,2,1), (1,2,2), (0,0,1), (1,2,3), (1,1,2), (1,2,0), (0,2,2), (1,1,1), (1,0,2), (1,0,2), (1,1,2), (0,0,3), (0,1,3), (0,1,0), (1,0,3), (0,2,1), (0,1,3), (1,1,2), (1,0,3), (0,1,3), (1,1,1), (0,1,0), (1,1,0), (0,1,1), (1,2,0), (1,1,1), (1,2,1), (1,0,0), (0,1,2), (0,2,1), (1,1,0), (1,1,3), (0,2,1), (1,2,1), (1,2,0), (1,0,1), (1,0,1), (0,2,1), (1,0,1), (1,1,1), (1,2,2), (1,0,1), (1,2,1), (0,2,3), (0,1,1), (0,0,2), (0,2,0), (1,1,1), (0,1,2), (0,2,1), (0,1,1), (1,2,2), (1,2,2), (0,2,1), (0,0,2), (1,2,3), (0,2,1), (1,1,3), (0,2,0), (0,2,1), (1,2,3), (1,1,1), (1,0,1), (0,0,3), (1,0,2), (0,1,1), (0,0,3), (1,0,3), (0,1,2), (1,1,0), (0,0,0)

At the 78th digit, all three digits equal zero. But the 78th digit of the digit-line in base 5 is 1. So when are the digits first equal to zero in bases 2 to 5? It’s not difficult to find out, but the difficulty of the search increases fast as the bases get bigger. Here are the results up to base 13 (note that bases 11 and 12 both have zeroes at digit 103721663):

dig=0 in bases 2 to 3 at the 10th digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 4 at the 78th digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 5 at the 182nd digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 6 at the 302nd digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 7 at the 12149th digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 8 at the 45243rd digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 9 at the 255261st digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 10 at the 8850623rd digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 12 at the 103721663rd digit of the digit-line
dig=0 in bases 2 to 13 at the 807778264th digit of the digit-line


I assume that, for any base b > 2, you can find some point in the digit-line at which d = 0 for all bases 2 to b. Indeed, I assume that this happens infinitely often. But I don’t know any short-cut for finding the first digit at which this occurs.


Previously pre-posted:

Can You Dij It? #1