Paradoxical Puzzle Pair

Two interesting puzzles, one of which looks hard and is in fact easy, while the other looks easy and is in fact hard.

1. Three Cards

The values attached to a deck of bridge cards start with the Two of Clubs as lowest, with Diamonds, Hearts and Ace of Spades as highest.

If you draw three cards at random from the deck, what is the probability that they will be drawn in order of increasing value? (Answer 1)


2. The Hungry Hunter

A hunter, having run out of food, met two shepherds. One of the shepherd had three loaves of bread and the other had five loaves. When the hunter asked for food, the shepherds agreed to divide the eight identical loaves equally between the three of them. The hunter thanked them and gave them $8. How should the shepherds divide the money? (Answer 2)

• Puzzles and answers from Erwin Brecher’s How Do You Survive a Duel? And Other Mathematical Diversions, Puzzles and Brainteasers (Carlton Books 2018)

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Answer #1: The puzzle sounds far more complicated than it is. The deck of cards is a red herring. The question reduces to this: Take three cards, say 2, 3 and 4 of clubs, facedown. What is the probability of turning them over in the order 2, 3, 4? There are six possible ways of arranging three cards. Therefore the probability is one-sixth.

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Answer #2: It would be wrong to split the money into $3 and $5. Each of the three ended up with 2⅔ loaves. In other words, the first shepherd parted with ⅓ of a loaf and the other shepherd with 2⅓ or 7/3 loaves. The first shepherd should therefore get $1 and the second shepherd $7.

Blue is the Killer

Eye Bogglers by Gianni A. Sarcone and Marie-Jo WaeberEye Bogglers: A Mesmerizing Mass of Amazing Illusions, Gianni A. Sarcone and Marie-Jo Waeber (Carlton Books 2011; paperback 2013)

A simple book with some complex illusions. It’s aimed at children but scientists have spent decades understanding how certain arrangements of colour and line fool the eye so powerfully. I particularly like the black-and-white tiger set below a patch of blue on page 60. Stare at the blue “for 15 seconds”, then look quickly at a tiny cross set between the tiger’s eyes and the killer turns colour.

So what’s not there appears to be there, just as, elsewhere, what’s there appears not to be. Straight lines seem curved; large figures seem small; the same colour seems light on the right, dark on the left. There are also some impossible figures, as made famous by M.C. Escher and now studied seriously by geometricians, but the only true art here is a “Face of Fruits” by Arcimboldo. The rest is artful, not art, but it’s interesting to think what Escher might have made of some of the ideas here. Mind is mechanism; mechanism can be fooled. Optical illusions are the most compelling examples, because vision is the most powerful of our senses, but the lesson you learn here is applicable everywhere. This book fools you for fun; others try to fool you for profit. Caveat spectator.

Simple but complex: The café wall illusion

Simple but complex: The café wall illusion