Stare-Way to Hair, Then

Medusa (c. 1875) by Frederick Sandys


Like William Waterhouse, Frederick Sandys (1829-1904) is called a Pre-Raphaelite. Alas, in Sandys’ case it’s true: like Rossetti, he did belong to that despicable, deplorable and downright disgusting movement. But like Rossetti again, he sometimes managed to break the strict Pre-Raphaelite principles of ugliness, ill-proportion and bad colouring. Indeed, Sandys may have been the most technically skilled of the Pre-Raphaelites. The marvellous chalk-drawing above is a good piece of evidence for that.


Previously pre-posted:

’Dys MissPerdita by Frederick Sandys

Hair Today

“We had a roadie guarding his dressing room, to stop him [Graham Bonnet] getting out, because he was threatening to have his hair cut. It was very petty, but it had become an obsession with me. But he got out of the back window and went and got his hair cut. I didn’t see him until we went on stage, and, sure enough, he’d had his hair cut really short. He was doing it just to annoy me.” — Ritchie Blackmore: “[…] Music is very serious”, The Guardian, 25/v/2017