Oh My Guardian #8

“When it comes to Harry Potter, JK Rowling just can’t leave it alone. This is not necessarily a bad thing – fans have got to see Harry and friends all grown-up in the Cursed Child plays – but she’s also managed to muddy the waters by her constant rejigging of the original narrative furniture.” — Fantastic Beasts isn’t racist, but JK Rowling should stop tweaking the source material, Hannah Flint, The Guardian, 28ix2018.


Oh My Guardian #7 — the previous entry in this award-winning series
Reds under the Thread more on mixed metaphors… in terms of The Guardian
All posts interrogating issues around the Guardian-reading community and its affiliates

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #34

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Roy des FleursScented Flora of the World: An Encyclopedia, Roy Genders (Robert Hale 1977)

Art to HartLives in Writing, David Lodge (Vintage Books 2015)

Could Yew Kudzu?Wicked Plants: The A-Z of Plants that Kill, Maim, Intoxicate and Otherwise Offend, Amy Stewart (Timber Press 2010)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

The Brain in Pain

You can stop reading now, if you want. Or can you? Are your decisions really your own, or are you and all other human beings merely spectators in the mind-arena, observing but neither influencing nor initiating what goes on there? Are all your apparent choices in your brain, but out of your hands, made by mechanisms beyond, or below, your conscious control?

In short, do you have free will? This is a big topic – one of the biggest. For me, the three most interesting things in the world are the Problem of Consciousness, the Problem of Existence and the Question of Free Will. I call consciousness and existence problems because I think they’re real. They’re actually there to be investigated and explained. I call free will a question because I don’t think it’s real. I don’t believe that human beings can choose freely or that any possible being, natural or supernatural, can do so. And I don’t believe we truly want free will: it’s an excuse for other things and something we gladly reject in certain circumstances.


Continue reading The Brain in Pain

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #4

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents…

Ink for Your PelfLiterary Theory: An Introduction, Terry Eagleton (1996)

Queer LogorrhoeaLesbian and Gay Studies: A Critical Introduction, Andy Medhurst and Sally R. Munt (1997)

Cigarettes and Al-QaedaHitch-22: A Memoir, Christopher Hitchens (2010)